Moderating Effects of Teacher-Child Relationship on the Association Between Unsociability and Play Behaviors


ASLAN Ö. M., BOZ M.

JOURNAL OF GENETIC PSYCHOLOGY, vol.183, no.2, pp.180-196, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 183 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/00221325.2022.2029811
  • Journal Name: JOURNAL OF GENETIC PSYCHOLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, IBZ Online, PASCAL, Applied Science & Technology Source, Child Development & Adolescent Studies, EBSCO Education Source, Educational research abstracts (ERA), EMBASE, MEDLINE, MLA - Modern Language Association Database, Psycinfo
  • Page Numbers: pp.180-196
  • Keywords: Teacher-child relationships, social withdrawal, shyness, unsociability, SOCIAL WITHDRAWAL SUBTYPES, YOUNG CHINESE CHILDREN, NONSOCIAL PLAY, STUDENT RELATIONSHIPS, SCHOOL ADJUSTMENT, PEER INTERACTIONS, SHYNESS, PRESCHOOL, SOLITUDE, ACHIEVEMENT
  • Hacettepe University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

The present study aimed to examine the moderating role of the quality of the relationship between children and their teachers (i.e., closeness and conflict), in children's unsociability and play behaviors (i.e., reticent behavior, social play). Participants were 211 three- to six-year-old children (M = 64.08 months, SD = 10.92, 94 girls, 117 boys). Mothers reported their unsociability; teachers reported teacher-child relationships and children's play behaviors. Results showed that close teacher-child relationships moderated the association between unsociability and social play in children (buffering effect). Teacher-child conflict exacerbated the relations between unsociability and reticent behavior. Findings show that teacher-child closeness is effective in revealing social play behaviors of unsociable children. Teachers can improve their relationship with unsociable children to provide nurturing social play behavior.