A survey of the occurrence of alpha-dicarbonyl compounds and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in dried fruits, fruit juices, puree and concentrates


AKTAĞ I., GÖKMEN V.

JOURNAL OF FOOD COMPOSITION AND ANALYSIS, vol.91, 2020 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 91
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.jfca.2020.103523
  • Journal Name: JOURNAL OF FOOD COMPOSITION AND ANALYSIS
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus, Academic Search Premier, PASCAL, Analytical Abstracts, BIOSIS, Biotechnology Research Abstracts, CAB Abstracts, Food Science & Technology Abstracts, Veterinary Science Database
  • Keywords: alpha-Dicarbonyl compounds, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, Dried fruit, Fruit juice, Fruit puree, Fruit puree concentrate, Juice concentrate, MAILLARD REACTION, APPLE JUICE, ORANGE JUICE, STORAGE, CARAMELISATION, PARAMETERS, SUCROSE, FOOD, HMF

Abstract

The aim of this study is to survey the content of a-dicarbonyl compounds and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in different processed fruit products. For this purpose, different commercial fruit products including dried fruits, fruit purees, puree concentrates, juices, and juice concentrates, as the examples of solid, semi-solid and liquid samples of sugar-rich and acidic food systems were analyzed. Among the a-dicarbonyl compounds, 3-deoxyglucosone, glucosone, 1-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxypentosone, threosone, diacetyl, methylglyoxal, and glyoxal were monitored. 3-deoxyglucosone formation, which was the dominant dicarbonyl compound in fruit products, varied between 21.9-4117.0 mg/kg, was the highest in dried fruits. 5-hydroxymethylfurfural could not be detected in fruit puree concentrates, whereas the highest concentration of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural with the median level ranging between not detectable and 2136.5 mg/kg was found in dried fruits. The results confirmed that lower pH and moisture promoted the formation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in fruit products. Accordingly, the concentrations of dicarbonyl compounds were found significantly higher than the levels of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in all types of fruit products.