Effects of metacognitions, self-compassion, and difficulties in emotion regulation on psychological resilience in oncology nurses


Kayalar A., HİÇDURMAZ D.

European Journal of Oncology Nursing, vol.70, 2024 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 70
  • Publication Date: 2024
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.ejon.2024.102568
  • Journal Name: European Journal of Oncology Nursing
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus, ASSIA, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Psycinfo
  • Keywords: Difficulties in emotion regulation, Emotion regulation, Metacognition, Oncology nurses, Psychological resilience, Self-compassion
  • Hacettepe University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Purpose: Providing care to individuals with cancer requires oncology nurses to have superior skills related to physical care and adaptation to the changing healthcare system, as well as witnessing and supporting the psychosocial difficulties experienced by patients and families in this process. It requires oncology nurses to be psychologically resilient. Therefore, it is crucial to determine the factors affecting the psychological resilience of oncology nurses. This study aimed to determine the effect of self-compassion, metacognitions, and difficulties in emotion regulation on psychological resilience in oncology nurses. Methods: This is a cross-sectional correlational study. The study was conducted with 121 oncology nurses providing active oncologic care and who volunteered to participate. The Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale-Short Form, the Self-Compassion Scale, and the Metacognitions Questionnaire-30 were used to collect data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficient, and multiple linear regression analysis. Results: The regression model established to determine the effect of self-compassion, metacognitions, and difficulties in emotion regulation on psychological resilience was statistically significant (F(3,117) = 24.086 p < 0.001) and explained 36.6% of the change in resilience. Among the independent variables, only self-compassion had a significant contribution to the model (p = 0.001). According to the model, 1-unit change in self-compassion caused 0.571-unit change in psychological resilience. Conclusion: Self-compassion, metacognitions, and difficulties in emotion regulation were significantly related to psychological resilience, but only self-compassion significantly affected psychological resilience.