Thickness, cross-sectional area, and stiffness of intrinsic foot muscles affect performance in single-leg stance balance tests in healthy sedentary young females


Tas S., Unluer N. O. , ÇETİN A.

JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICS, vol.99, 2020 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 99
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2019.109530
  • Title of Journal : JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICS

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thickness, cross-sectional area and stiffness of intrinsic foot muscles on performance in single-leg stance balance tasks in healthy sedentary young females. This study included a total of 40 healthy sedentary young females between the ages of 19 and 35 years. Single-leg stance balance assessments were carried out using Biodex Balance Systems (Biodex Medical Systems, Shirley, NY, USA). Performance in the single-leg stance balance tests was assessed using the overall stability index (OSI), mediolateral stability index (MLSI) and the anteroposterior stability index (APSI). Lower scores indicated better postural stability. Stiffness, thickness and cross-sectional area measurements of the abductor hallucis (AbH), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and flexor hallucis brevis (FHB) muscles were performed using an ultrasonography device. Larger AbH and FHB muscles were correlated with higher OSI, APSI, and MLSI (r = 0.31-0.46, p < 0.05), whereas larger FDB muscle was correlated with higher OSI and MLSI (r = 0.28-0.38, p < 0.05). Higher stiffness of the AbH and FHB muscles were correlated with lower OSI, APSI, and MLSI (r = -0.32 to 0.58, p < 0.05), but stiffness of the FDB muscle was not significantly correlated with OSI, APSI, and MLSI (r = 0.03-0.22, p > 0.05). These results suggest that larger AbH, FDB and FHB muscles are related to reduced performance in single-leg stance balance tests, whereas higher AbH and FHB stiffness are related to better performance in single-leg stance balance tests in healthy sedentary young females. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.