Relationship between foot sensation and standing balance in patients with multiple sclerosis


ÇITAKER S., GÜÇLÜ GÜNDÜZ A., GÜÇLÜ M. B. , NAZLIEL B., İRKEÇ C., Kaya D.

GAIT & POSTURE, vol.34, no.2, pp.275-278, 2011 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 34 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2011.05.015
  • Title of Journal : GAIT & POSTURE
  • Page Numbers: pp.275-278

Abstract

The aims of the present study were to investigate the relationship between the foot sensations and standing balance in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and find out the sensation, which best predicts balance. Twenty-seven patients with MS (Expanded Disability Status Scale 1-3.5) and 10 healthy volunteers were included. Threshold of light touch-pressure, duration of vibration, and distance of two-point discrimination of the foot sole were assessed. Duration of static one-leg standing balance was measured. Light touch-pressure, vibration, two-point discrimination sensations of the foot sole, and duration of one-leg standing balance were decreased in patients with MS compared with controls (p < 0.05). Sensation of the foot sole was related with duration of one-leg standing balance in patients with MS. In the multiple regression analysis conducted in the 27 MS patients, 47.6% of the variance in the duration of one-leg standing balance was explained by two-point discrimination sensation of the heel (R(2) = 0.359, p = 0.001) and vibration sensation of the first metatarsal head (R(2) = 0.118, p = 0.029). As the cutaneous receptors sensitivity decreases in the foot sole the standing balance impairs in patients with MS. Two-point discrimination sensation of the heel and vibration sensation of the first metatarsal head region are the best predictors of the static standing balance in patients with MS. Other factors which could be possible to predict balance and effects of sensorial training of foot on balance should be investigated. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.