Pilot study on the effects of a culturally-sensitive and standard pain neuroscience education for Hausa-speaking patients with chronic neck pain


Mukhtar N. B. , Meeus M., GÜRŞEN C. , Mohammed J., De Pauw R., Cagnie B.

DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, 2021 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/09638288.2021.1988155
  • Title of Journal : DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION
  • Keywords: Pain neuroscience education, culturally-sensitive, Hausa, chronic neck pain, effects, LOW-BACK-PAIN, CHRONIC MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN, CLINICAL-PRACTICE GUIDELINE, EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS, SAMPLE-SIZE, DISORDERS, NEUROPHYSIOLOGY, QUESTIONNAIRE, EPIDEMIOLOGY, FOUNDATION

Abstract

Purpose To pilot feasibility and assess preliminary effectiveness of standard and culture-sensitive Pain Neuroscience Education (PNE) among Hausa-speaking patients with Chronic Neck Pain (CNP). Methods Adverts (online & clinic-based) were used to recruit Hausa-speaking patients with nonspecific CNP in Kano, Nigeria. Selected participants were randomized to culture-sensitive PNE (CSPNE), standard PNE (PNE), or control groups. Each group received bi-weekly sessions of exercise therapy for 6 weeks. Two sessions of PNE plus a home-based session were administered before exercise therapy in the PNE groups. Primary (pain-intensity and disability) and secondary (pain-knowledge, pain catastrophizing, and quality of life) outcomes were measured. The study was pre-registered (PACTR201902788269426). Results Fifty-three (out of 64) participants met the inclusion criteria. The majority of them were recruited through radio adverts (83%). Interventions were successfully administered and data collection was completed for the participants. About 15% and 17% drop-out rate was recorded before intervention (post-randomization) and during follow-up, respectively. Main results indicated that significant within-group improvements in disability and pain knowledge scores were found in favor of the PNE groups. Conclusion Culture-sensitive and standard PNE plus exercise therapy are feasible for Hausa patients with CNP, and current findings indicate support for reducing disability and increasing pain knowledge among them.