The Effects of Different Exercise Trainings on Suprahyoid Muscle Activation, Tongue Pressure Force and Dysphagia Limit in Healthy Subjects


Kilinc H. E. , Arslan S. S. , DEMİR N. , Karaduman A.

DYSPHAGIA, cilt.35, ss.717-724, 2020 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 35 Konu: 4
  • Basım Tarihi: 2020
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1007/s00455-019-10079-w
  • Dergi Adı: DYSPHAGIA
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.717-724

Özet

Suprahyoid muscle activation and tongue pressure force play a critical role for swallowing function. In addition, dysphagia limit is one of most important factors indicating swallowing efficiency. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 8-week training sessions of three different exercises including chin tuck against resistance (CTAR), Shaker exercises and chin tuck exercise with theraband on suprahyoid muscle activity, anterior tongue pressure and dysphagia limit in healthy subjects. Thirty-six healthy volunteers aged between 18 and 40 years who scored below 3 points from Turkish version of Eating Assessment Tool (T-EAT-10) were included in the study, and all participants were divided into three groups randomly. Maximal suprahyoid muscle activations and dysphagia limit of participants were assessed by superficial electromyography. CTAR and chin tuck exercise with theraband increased the maximum suprahyoid muscle activation (p(1) = 0.004,p(2) = 0.018), whereas Shaker exercise did not increase maximal suprahyoid muscle activation (p = 0.507) after exercise training. CTAR and chin tuck exercise with theraband increased tongue pressure (p(1) = 0.045,p(2) = 0.041), while Shaker exercise did not increase anterior tongue pressure (p = 0.248). There was no statistically significant difference in dysphagia limits in three groups between before and after exercise training (p > 0.05). As a result, although CTAR seems to be the most effective exercise in most parameters, chin tuck exercise with theraband can also be used as an alternative to CTAR to improve suprahyoid muscle activity and tongue pressure.