Production of time reference in Turkish Broca's aphasia: The effect of morphological complexity


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KURADA H. Z. , AYDIN Ö., KÖSE A.

CLINICAL LINGUISTICS & PHONETICS, 2021 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/02699206.2021.1963319
  • Title of Journal : CLINICAL LINGUISTICS & PHONETICS
  • Keywords: Time reference, Broca's aphasia, Turkish, morphological complexity, verb inflection, AGRAMMATIC APHASIA, FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES, SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS, VERB INFLECTIONS, GREEK APHASIA, NONFLUENT, TENSE, FLUENT, IMPAIRMENT, SEVERITY

Abstract

In PWA (people with aphasia) difficulties with sentences that refer to the past compared to non-past time reference have been shown for many languages, including Turkish. However, the impact of morphological complexity on past time reference ability in production has not yet been reported for Turkish-speaking PWA. Turkish, where verb forms have complex inflectional paradigms and exhibit overt and non-overt morphology, facilitates the examination of the effects of morphological complexity. The current study has two objectives: 1) to investigate whether the morphological complexity of the verb form affects time reference production of Turkish-speaking PWA and 2) to provide analysis for the error patterns discovered. Seventeen Turkish individuals with Broca's aphasia who were matched in age with a control group of 17 neurologically intact Turkish individuals were tested with a picture sentence completion task. Test conditions were present progressive, simple past, past perfect, past progressive, and future tense. The task required the participants to complete each sentence frame with a verb. Our findings show that Turkish-speaking PWA were more successful in producing verb forms referring to non-past than verb forms referring to the past time reference. The current study supports previous findings that past is more difficult than non-past time reference for Turkish-speaking PWA. In terms of morphological complexity, we find that PWA were more impaired when producing morphologically complex verb forms rather than morphologically simple forms. We argue that these impairments lie in the realization of overt morphology.