The effects of power exercises on body structure and function, activity and participation in children with cerebral palsy: an ICF-based systematic review


KAYA KARA Ö., GÜRŞEN C., ÇETİN S. Y., Tascioglu E. N., Muftuoglu S., Damiano D. L.

DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Review
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/09638288.2022.2138575
  • Journal Name: DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, ASSIA, AgeLine, CINAHL, Educational research abstracts (ERA), EMBASE, Linguistics & Language Behavior Abstracts, MEDLINE, Psycinfo, Public Affairs Index, SportDiscus, Violence & Abuse Abstracts
  • Keywords: Cerebral palsy, power training, strength training, muscle power, systematic review, INTERNATIONAL-CLASSIFICATION, PROGRESSIVE RESISTANCE, MUSCLE STRENGTH, YOUNG-CHILDREN, DISABILITY, MOBILITY, HEALTH, YOUTH, INTERVENTIONS, ADOLESCENTS
  • Hacettepe University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Purpose To systematically review the literature for evidence of effectiveness of power exercises on physical, physiological, and functional outcomes in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Materials and methods Methodological quality and evidence synthesis were assessed with using the Cochrane Risk of Bias (RoB) Tools and Modified Bakker Scale. Using the International Classification of Functioning (ICF), outcome measures for muscle agriculture, gait, balance, motor function, aerobic/anaerobic fitness, daily living, mobility, and school participation were categorised. Results The overall RoB of four randomised clinical trials was low, one had some concerns and two were rated as high. Moderate evidence was found that power exercises increased walking speed, activities of daily living, muscle strength, and enhanced gross motor function more than a routine physical therapy program. Conclusions The lack of stronger evidence for power training interventions to improve muscle architecture, muscle function, walking capacity, and mobility in children with CP might be explained by the differences in training protocols and degree to which these meet the physiological definition of power, different methods of measuring power, limited durations of training, and the relative effectiveness of control interventions. Future studies should include a stronger focus on child and family-centred participation goals.