Music genre and volume do not modulate energy intake, short-term satiety, and mood states: A randomized controlled trial


Cetin C., AYAZ A., SAMUR F. G. , AKYOL MUTLU A.

PSYCHOLOGY OF MUSIC, 2022 (AHCI) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1177/03057356221129320
  • Journal Name: PSYCHOLOGY OF MUSIC
  • Journal Indexes: Arts and Humanities Citation Index (AHCI), Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus, IBZ Online, Periodicals Index Online, Communication Abstracts, Educational research abstracts (ERA), Music Index, Music Periodicals Database, Psycinfo, RILM Abstracts of Music Literature, DIALNET
  • Keywords: music genre, music volume, energy intake, satiety, mood, appetite, FOOD-INTAKE, ENVIRONMENTAL-FACTORS, BACKGROUND MUSIC, MEAL INTAKE, INCREASES, CONSUMPTION, SOUND, BEHAVIOR, FLAVOR
  • Hacettepe University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate whether background music genre and volume can alter energy intake, short-term satiety, and mood states in women with normal body weight. Participants (N = 35) were tested using a randomized, crossover design consisting of five conditions: the control day on which no music was playing (CON), 60-dB Western classical (60 dB C), 80-dB Western classical (80 dB C), 60-dB rock (60 dB R), and 80-dB rock (80 dB R) music. The four music conditions were from 15 min before lunch and during an ad libitum lunch until the end of the meal. The participants were first asked to report visual analog scale (VAS) scores on sensory outcomes, lunch was served, and the energy intake of the individuals and their profile of mood states (POMS) were measured. Overall, mean VAS scores were similar between the groups on all of the test days (p > .05). Listening to different music genres and volumes did not exert a significant effect on energy intake (p > .05). The only mood state that differed significantly was confusion-bewilderment (p = .017). Neither music genre nor volume influence short-term energy intake and satiety-related VAS outcomes.