Development and characterization of liposomal formulations for rapamycin delivery and investigation of their antiproliferative effect on MCF7 cells


Rouf M. A. , VURAL İ. , Renoir J. M. , Hincal A. A.

JOURNAL OF LIPOSOME RESEARCH, cilt.19, sa.4, ss.322-331, 2009 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Yayın Türü: Makale / Tam Makale
  • Cilt numarası: 19 Konu: 4
  • Basım Tarihi: 2009
  • Doi Numarası: 10.3109/08982100902963043
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF LIPOSOME RESEARCH
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.322-331

Özet

Rapamycin (Sirolimus) is a macrolide lactone with antifungal, immunosuppressant, and antiproliferative actions. The mechanism of rapamycin action involves the inhibition of mTOR and subsequent cytostasis. Rapamycin also prevents angiogenesis in tumors and can prevent cancer cells' resistance to other chemotherapeutic agents. However, very poor water solubility, bioavailability, only slight solubility in acceptable parenteral excipients, chemical instability, and major sequestration (95%) of free rapamycin into the erythrocytes have prevented its development as an anticancer drug. To address these problems, it was attempted to develop liposomal rapamycin delivery systems in this study. Conventional and pegylated liposomes were prepared with various lipid and cholesterol ratios. They were then characterized; these liposomes contained 0.68-0.90 mg of rapamycin per milliliter of liposome suspension. Having suitable particle size, these liposomes successfully retained the entrapped drug. Both types of liposomes were found to be effective; however, conventional liposomes showed better antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 cells than pegylated liposomes. But, pegylated liposome showed better stability than conventional liposomes. In conclusion, the enhanced permeability and retention effercts of tumors should provide the opportunity for pegylated liposomal rapamycin to be applied as an intravenous drug-delivery system for targeted delivery to cancer cells, avoiding the major sequestration of free rapamycin into the erythrocytes.