Respiratory viral infections in infants with possible sepsis


AYKAÇ K. , KARADAĞ ÖNCEL E. , TANIR BAŞARANOĞLU S. , ALP A. , CENGİZ A. B. , CEYHAN M. , ...Daha Fazla

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL VIROLOGY, cilt.91, ss.171-178, 2019 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 91 Konu: 2
  • Basım Tarihi: 2019
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1002/jmv.25309
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF MEDICAL VIROLOGY
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.171-178

Özet

Background Knowledge of infections leading to sepsis is needed to develop comprehensive infection prevention and sepsis, as well as early recognition and treatment strategies.The aim of this study was to investigate the etiology of sepsis and evaluate the proportion of respiratory viral pathogens in infants under two years of age with possible sepsis. Methods The prospective study was performed in two years. Multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to detect viral pathogens. All patients who were included in this study had sepsis symptoms as defined by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. Results We compared 90 patients with sepsis into three groups as patients (n = 33) who had only viral positivity in nasopharyngeal swab, patients (17) had proven bacterial infection with or without viral infection, and patients (40) without the pathogen detection. Human rhinovirus (16.7%) and influenza (7.8%) were the most commonly seen viruses. A cough was more common in the viral infection group than other groups (P = 0.02) and median thrombocyte count was lower in the bacterial infection group than the others (P = 0.01). Patients having bacterial sepsis had the longest duration of hospitalization than the other groups (P = 0.04). During winter and spring seaons, patients with sepsis had more viral infection; however, in summer and autumn period, patients were mostly in a state that we could not prove infection agents (P = 0.02). Conclusions Our results suggest that respiratory tract viruses may play an important role in patients with sepsis and they should be kept in mind, especially during winter and spring seasons. In overall infection, viral respiratory viruses as a single pathogen with a detection rate of 36.6% in sepsis etiology.