Thermal, microscopic, and quality properties of low-fat frankfurters and emulsions produced by addition of different hydrocolloids


YILMAZ E. E. , VURAL H. , YADIGARI R. J.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FOOD PROPERTIES, cilt.20, sa.9, ss.1987-2002, 2017 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 20 Konu: 9
  • Basım Tarihi: 2017
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1080/10942912.2016.1230743
  • Dergi Adı: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FOOD PROPERTIES
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.1987-2002

Özet

This study involves investigation of the effects of addition of different hydrocolloids on the thermal, microscopic, and quality properties of low-fat meat emulsions and frankfurters. The emulsion stability of the samples containing 0.5% -carrageenan, -carrageenan or chitosan, and the 1% chitosan containing sample were lower than that of the control group. Thermal analyses showed three denaturation peaks for minced meat at 57.42 degrees C, 64.21 degrees C and 78.58 degrees C. While the denaturation temperature of myosin for the sample produced with 0.5% of -carrageenan was significantly lower, samples containing 1% -carrageenan and 0.5% -carrageenan were not significantly different than that of the control group. The thermal denaturation temperature of myosin for samples containing 1% -carrageenan, and for 0.5% and 1% guar gum, xanthan gum and chitosan was significantly higher than that of the control. The denaturation temperature of sarcoplasmic proteins and actin for samples with 1% - and -carrageenan and 0.5% chitosan, was higher than for the control, while for other samples it was not significantly different. The scanning electron microscopy images of the control group and samples produced with 0.5% and 1% -carrageenan, 0.5% and 1% guar gum, and 1% -carrageenan showed gel-like structures, whereas other samples did not. Sensory evaluations showed that addition of hydrocolloids and reduced fat content lowered acceptance of frankfurters. Results showed that both - and -carrageenan, especially at 0.5% were the most suitable hydrocolloids for production of low-fat frankfurters and xanthan gum was the least suitable since it did not form proper structure.