Palaeo-Eskimo genetic ancestry and the peopling of Chukotka and North America


Flegontov P., Altinisik N. E. , Changmai P., Rohland N., Mallick S., Adamski N., ...Daha Fazla

NATURE, cilt.570, ss.236-253, 2019 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 570 Konu: 7760
  • Basım Tarihi: 2019
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1038/s41586-019-1251-y
  • Dergi Adı: NATURE
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.236-253

Özet

Much of the American Arctic was first settled 5,000 years ago, by groups of people known as Palaeo-Eskimos. They were subsequently joined and largely displaced around 1,000 years ago by ancestors of the present-day Inuit and Yup'ik(1-3). The genetic relationship between Palaeo-Eskimos and Native American, Inuit, Yup'ik and Aleut populations remains uncertain(4-6). Here we present genomic data for 48 ancient individuals from Chukotka, East Siberia, the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, and the Canadian Arctic. We co-analyse these data with data from present-day Alaskan Inupiat and West Siberian populations and published genomes. Using methods based on rare-allele and haplotype sharing, as well as established techniques(4,7-9), we show that Palaeo-Eskimo-related ancestry is ubiquitous among people who speak Na-Dene and Eskimo-Aleut languages. We develop a comprehensive model for the Holocene peopling events of Chukotka and North America, and show that Na-Dene-speaking peoples, people of the Aleutian Islands, and Yup'ik and Inuit across the Arctic region all share ancestry from a single Palaeo-Eskimo-related Siberian source.