Effects of Cantilever Length and Implant Inclination on he Stress Distribution of Mandibular Prosthetic Restorations Constructed from Monolithic Zirconia Ceramic


Durkan R., OYAR P. , Deste G.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL IMPLANTS, cilt.35, ss.121-129, 2020 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 35 Konu: 1
  • Basım Tarihi: 2020
  • Doi Numarası: 10.11607/jomi.7744
  • Dergi Adı: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL IMPLANTS
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.121-129

Özet

Purpose: This study aimed to biomechanically evaluate the effects of cantilever length and implant inclination on the stress distribution of mandibular prosthetic restorations constructed from monolithic zirconia ceramic. Materials and Methods: Mandibular full-arch prostheses supported by four implants constructed from monolithic zirconia were designed using either a 5-mm or 9-mm cantilever length and a 15-degree or 30-degree distal tilt for the posterior implants. A simulated static load of 600 N was applied from the right side at a 45-degree angle. Von Mises and principal stress values in superstructures were analyzed using the Mesh VR Studio program. Results: When the effects of cantilever length were examined, in the models with the 15-degree implant tilt, stress values for posterior implants, porcelain, and cortical bone were lower when the cantilever length was shorter (5 mm). In the models with the 30-degree implant tilt, stress values in all implants (except for the anterior implant on the right) and in the porcelain superstructure were lower when the cantilever length was shorter; however, stress values for cortical and spongious bone were lower with the longer (9 mm) cantilever. When the effects of implant inclination were examined, in the models with a 5-mm cantilever, stress values for posterior implants and cortical bone were lower when the implant tilt was more severe (30 degrees). In the models with a 9-mm cantilever length, stress values for the right anterior implant, posterior implants, and cortical bone were lower when the implant tilt was less severe (15 degrees). Conclusion: Cantilever length and posterior implant inclination affected the distribution of force. Increasing the cantilever length led to a reduction in stress values in distally tilted posterior implants. Moreover, increasing the distal inclination led to a reduction in stress values in both the distally tilted posterior implants and cortical bone tissue in the model with a short cantilever. The monolithic zirconia fullarch porcelain superstructure was not affected by implant angulation, but was affected by cantilever length, with lower stress values observed with a longer cantilever.