Effect of plantar vibration on static and dynamic balance in stroke patients: a randomised controlled study


ÖNAL B. , Sertel M., Karaca G.

PHYSIOTHERAPY, vol.116, pp.1-8, 2022 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 116
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.physio.2022.02.002
  • Title of Journal : PHYSIOTHERAPY
  • Page Numbers: pp.1-8
  • Keywords: Balance, Local vibration, Plantar region, Rehabilitation, Stroke, WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION, ACHILLES-TENDON VIBRATION, MUSCLE VIBRATION, MOTOR, STIMULATION, RELIABILITY, SURVIVORS, RECOVERY, GAIT, IMPAIRMENTS

Abstract

Objective To investigate the effects of local vibration applied to the plantar region of the foot on static and dynamic balance in stroke patients.Design Randomised, controlled trial.Setting Inpatient.Participants Thirty patients with stroke were randomised equally to the vibration and control groups. Intervention The control group underwent conventional physical therapy (CPT) for 4 weeks. The vibration group underwent local vibration therapy at a frequency of 80 Hz and CPT for 4 weeks.Outcome measures The primary outcome measure was the Overall Stability Index (OSI). The secondary outcome measures were: the Anteroposterior Stability Index, Mediolateral Stability Index, fall risk, Berg Balance Scale, Functional Reach Test (FRT), and Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) to assess balance; the Trunk Impairment Scale to measure trunk function; and the 10-m Walk Test (10MWT) to measure walking speed.Results Participants receiving plantar vibration experienced greater improvements in static and dynamic balance assessments compared with participants in the control group. The mean change in OSI score between baseline and 4 weeks was 0.8 [standard deviation (SD) 0.8] for the vibration group and 0.02 (SD 0.6) for the control group [mean difference 0.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1 to 0.7]. The median change in fall risk score was 0.7 [interquartile range (IQR) 0.4 to 1.4] for the vibration group and 0.1 (IQR-0.1 to 0.6) for the control group (median difference 0.5, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.7). The median change in TUG time was 4 (IQR 1 to 7) seconds for the vibration group and 4 (IQR 0 to 2) seconds for the control group (median difference 2.5, 95% CI 1.5 to 3.5).Conclusion These findings suggest that plantar vibration is useful in stroke patients. Plantar vibration can be applied to support CPT. Clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT03784768.(c) 2022 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.