Examining preservice teachers' decision behaviors and individual differences in three online case-based approaches


Cevik Y. , Andre T.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH, cilt.58, ss.1-14, 2013 (SSCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 58
  • Basım Tarihi: 2013
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1016/j.ijer.2013.01.005
  • Dergi Adı: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.1-14

Özet

This study compared the impact of three types of case-based methods (case-based reasoning, worked example, and faded worked example) on preservice teachers' (n = 71) interaction with decision tasks and whether decision related measures (task difficulty, mental effort, decision making performance) were associated with the differences in student characteristics (decision making styles, self-efficacy, confidence). Participants in this study received a short-term implementation of one of these three major approaches to case-based instruction. The results showed that while students' perceptions of task difficulty and mental effort did not change as a function of treatment, the worked example group, compared to the case-based reasoning and faded worked example groups, performed better on making reason-based decisions related to classroom management. Furthermore, some of the relationships between individual differences and decision related measures were inconsistent with the existing literature. (c) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This study compared the impact of three types of case-based methods (case-based reasoning, worked example, and faded worked example) on preservice teachers’ (n = 71) interaction with decision tasks and whether decision related measures (task difficulty, mental effort, decision making performance) were associated with the differences in student characteristics (decision making styles, self-efficacy, confidence). Participants in this study received a short-term implementation of one of these three major approaches to case-based instruction. The results showed that while students’ perceptions of task difficulty and mental effort did not change as a function of treatment, the worked example group, compared to the case-based reasoning and faded worked example groups, performed better on making reason-based decisions related to classroom management. Furthermore, some of the relationships between individual differences and decision related measures were inconsistent with the existing literature.