In vivo response to biodegradable controlled antibiotic release systems


Korkusuz F., Korkusuz P. , Eksioglu F., Gursel I., Hasirci V.

JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH, cilt.55, ss.217-228, 2001 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 55 Konu: 2
  • Basım Tarihi: 2001
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.217-228

Özet

In this study, the major goal was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo findings by macroscopy, radiology, and histology to determine the effectiveness of therapy of experimental implant-related osteomyelitis with antibiotic carrier rods constructed of microbial polyesters. The polymers used were poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxyvalerate) [P(3HB-co-4-HB)] and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxy-valerate) [P(3-HB-co-3-HV)]. Both the Sulperazone(R) and the Duocid(R)-P(3-HB-co-4-HB) rods with a drug to polymer ratio of 1:1 (w/w) were effective in treating the bone infection that was experimentally initiated by inoculation of a hemolytic strain of Staphylococcus aureus (coagulase positive; phage type 52/52b) together with metal implants into the medullary area of rabbit tibia. Macroscopical data revealed that the effectiveness of therapy was apparent at week 6 for all categories tested. Radiological findings with Duocid(R)- and Sulperazone(R)-loaded P(3-HB-co-4-HB) rods improved significantly when judged by changes in periosteal elevation, widening of bone shaft, new bone formation, and soft-tissue deformation after 6 weeks of implantation. Histologically the signs of infection were found to subside by weeks 3 and 6. inflammatory cells were replaced with bone-forming cells upon treatment with Sulperazone(R)-P(3-HB-co-4-HB) and Duocid(R)-P(3-HB-co-4-HB). Osteoblastic activity was prominent. Intramedullary inflammation, although still present, started to be replaced by fibrous or bony tissue. Histological findings presented the subsidence of infection. In summary, the antibiotic-loaded biopolymeric rods appeared to have potential as a new controlled-release system for the treatment of implant related osteomyelitis and chronic osteomyelitis. (C) 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.