Neuroticism and Religiosity: The Role of Obsessive Beliefs, Thought-Control Strategies and Guilt in Scrupulosity and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms Among Muslim Undergraduates


İNÖZÜ MERMERKAYA M., KAHYA Y., YORULMAZ O.

JOURNAL OF RELIGION & HEALTH, vol.59, no.3, pp.1144-1160, 2020 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 59 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s10943-018-0603-5
  • Journal Name: JOURNAL OF RELIGION & HEALTH
  • Journal Indexes: Arts and Humanities Citation Index, Social Sciences Citation Index, Scopus, Academic Search Premier, IBZ Online, ATLA Religion Database, CINAHL, EMBASE, Index Islamicus, MEDLINE, Psycinfo
  • Page Numbers: pp.1144-1160
  • Keywords: Vulnerability factors, Scrupulosity, Obsessive-compulsive symptoms, Cognitive model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Guilt, PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES, COGNITIVE THEORY, PENN INVENTORY, ACTION FUSION, OCI-R, TURKISH, QUESTIONNAIRE, VALIDATION, DISORDER, INDIVIDUALS

Abstract

Neuroticism and religiosity are distal vulnerability factors for OCD phenomenon. The present study aimed to examine the roles of obsessive beliefs (OBs), thought-control strategies, and guilt in the relationship between these vulnerability factors and obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCSs), specifically scrupulosity symptoms in a Muslim sample via SEM. The sample consisted of 273 university students who filled out a set of questionnaires. The results indicated that neuroticism and the degree of religiosity predict OBs that are positively associated with guilt and self-punishment both of which predict scrupulosity and other OCSs. Findings of the present study were discussed in the context of the related literature.