Radiation synthesis of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-kappa-carrageenan hydrogels and their use in wound dressing applications. I. Preliminary laboratory tests


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Sen M. , Avci E. N.

JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH PART A, ss.187-196, 2005 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Yayın Türü: Makale / Tam Makale
  • Basım Tarihi: 2005
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1002/jbm.a.30308
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH PART A
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.187-196

Özet

Poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-kappa-carrageenan hydrogels (PVP-KC) were prepared by irradiating the mixtures of aqueous solutions of PVP, KC, potassium chloride, and poly(ethylene glycol) by gamma-rays at different doses. Their preliminary laboratory tests were evaluated to identify their usability in wound dressing applications. For investigation of the effect of components on the gelation of PVP, sol-gel analyses were made and gel fractions of the hydrogels were determined. Mechanical experiments were conducted for both unirradiated and irradiated samples. For investigation of the fluid uptake capacity of the hydrogels, swelling experiments were performed in pseudo-extracellular fluid solution at various temperatures. Acidity/alkalinity (pH) and electrical conductivity tests were achieved from aqueous extracts of hydrogels, and bioadhesion strength of the hydrogels was investigated on human skin. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)–κ-carrageenan hydrogels (PVP-KC) were prepared by irradiating the mixtures of aqueous solutions of PVP, KC, potassium chloride, and poly(ethylene glycol) by γ-rays at different doses. Their preliminary laboratory tests were evaluated to identify their usability in wound dressing applications. For investigation of the effect of components on the gelation of PVP, sol–gel analyses were made and gel fractions of the hydrogels were determined. Mechanical experiments were conducted for both unirradiated and irradiated samples. For investigation of the fluid uptake capacity of the hydrogels, swelling experiments were performed in pseudo-extracellular fluid solution at various temperatures. Acidity/alkalinity (pH) and electrical conductivity tests were achieved from aqueous extracts of hydrogels, and bioadhesion strength of the hydrogels was investigated on human skin.