What Could Aid in Slowing Down Cognitive Function?


İlhan A., Varlı M., Bilgiç P.

Galician Medical Journal, vol.28, no.2, pp.1-7, 2021 (Peer-Reviewed Journal)

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 28 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.21802/gmj.2021.2.4
  • Journal Name: Galician Medical Journal
  • Journal Indexes: Directory of Open Access Journals
  • Page Numbers: pp.1-7

Abstract

Aim: The objective of this research was to assess the relationship between cognitive function, physical activity level, nutritional and depression status in the elderly.
Materials and Methods: A total of 200 individuals (65 years) were included in the study. General characteristics of the individuals, biochemical findings, nutritional habits, 24-hour physical activity level and food consumption records were assessed. Cognitive function and depression status were screened by the Standardized Mini-Mental State Examination (S-MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF), respectively. 
Results: Thirty-eight (19%) of the 200 individuals were diagnosed with dementia. On the evaluation of all the individuals, moderate and statistically significant negative correlation (r=-0.558, p < 0.01) was found between the S-MMSE and GDS-SF values. In addition, a moderate and statistically significant positive correlation was found between the S-MMSE and physical activity level values (r=0.553, p < 0.01). Vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin
B3, vitamin B6, and zinc intakes were lower in women than in men (p < 0.05). Moreover, it was observed that the vitamin B3 and calcium intakes were below the recommended daily intake in both the genders.
Conclusions: Proper nutritional treatment and increasing the levels of physical activity may aid in slowing down the progression of dementia.

Aim: The objective of this research was to assess the relationship between cognitive function, physical activity level, nutritional and depression status in the elderly.
Materials and Methods: A total of 200 individuals (65 years) were included in the study. General characteristics of the individuals, biochemical findings, nutritional habits, 24-hour physical activity level and food consumption records were assessed. Cognitive function and depression status were screened by the Standardized Mini-Mental State Examination (S-MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF), respectively. 
Results: Thirty-eight (19%) of the 200 individuals were diagnosed with dementia. On the evaluation of all the individuals, moderate and statistically significant negative correlation (r=-0.558, p < 0.01) was found between the S-MMSE and GDS-SF values. In addition, a moderate and statistically significant positive correlation was found between the S-MMSE and physical activity level values (r=0.553, p < 0.01). Vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin
B3, vitamin B6, and zinc intakes were lower in women than in men (p < 0.05). Moreover, it was observed that the vitamin B3 and calcium intakes were below the recommended daily intake in both the genders.
Conclusions: Proper nutritional treatment and increasing the levels of physical activity may aid in slowing down the progression of dementia.